“The Architecture of the Foot”

“The Architecture of the Foot”

When examining the architecture of the foot we see that it is, in fact, a tripod. The three “feet” that make up the tripod are the heel bone (calcaneus), the head of the first metatarsal (the big toe mound), and the head of the fifth metatarsal (the little toe mound). Connecting each of the three feet are three myofascial slings, or arches. These are the medial longitudinal arch that runs along the medial side of the foot; the lateral longitudinal arch that runs along the lateral side of the foot; and the transverse arch that spans the foot from the head of the first metatarsal to the head of the fifth metatarsal. When the three feet of the tripod bear weight equally, then the foot is in a stable position. If one of the feet is not bearing load our nervous system will sense instability and turn off or inhibit some of the muscles responsible for whichever action we’re trying to produce.

Plantar sensory feedback, primarily from the proprioceptors, plays a central role in safe and effective locomotion and in stabilizing the stationary body. When we are upright and supported by our feet the nervous system measures the fluctuation of pressure from receptors on the sole of the foot. From that proprioceptive feedback, we unconsciously put our body in the right place, balanced over that foot. When the body responds properly to feedback from the feet, the positive response feedback turns on, and in turn it switches on the anti-gravity muscles of the leg.

The problem is that many runners have lost connection with their feet. Most runners have either non-responsive, floppy feet, or they have functionally rigid feet, which is the complete opposite of the listening foot. This is a foot that hangs on like grim death by grabbing the floor, trying to maintain some semblance of equilibrium or balance so the body doesn’t topple. Suddenly, all of the athlete’s control and tension is from the knee down. This is a common sight in yoga classes: when stability is tested, as with a balancing posture for example, the student’s toes curl under and grip the floor, the foot shrinks, and the muscles of the lower leg twitch and quiver in an attempt to stabilize the body. So if the practitioner lacks balance, stability, or control, peripheral tension is created and the listening foot is doing anything but listening. Now it’s not able to relay high quality proprioceptive information, which is essential to the body’s ability to orientate itself in space and maintain equilibrium.

What we want is for the information from our feet to flow freely and orient our body with perfect alignment, balance, and control. So if the emotional, neuromuscular, and cognitive connection with our feet is dysfunctional, this will be reflected in the quality of the sensory information flowing through the body, with predictable consequences. Yoga is a method of integration that requires the practitioner to bring awareness to all regions of the body, without regard to how challenging that process may be.

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